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The Cane Corso Coat

By Nicola Mille

 

Oftentimes, I’ll hear Cane Corso fanciers talk about a short coat, and I think that many of them really don’t have a very clear idea of what “short” means. A short coat is a centimeter, maybe a centimeter and a half – roughly one-third to a little over half an inch long. When a coat starts getting longer than that, it’s no longer short– it’s a long coat, at least in terms of the Cane Corso.

 

The Cane Corso is a breed that is frequently described – in the standard, in commentary, in the old texts – as elegant and noble. And this nobility is lost with an excessive length of coat, just as it is incorrect for the Cane Corso to have an oily coat. The Cane Corso shouldn’t have a coat that’s too heavy, with tufts of hair sticking out all over. People may call these “rustic” Cane Corsos, but what they really are is incorrect.

 

The Cane Corso should be a nobile breed, and a relatively short coat lends to that air of regalness.

The Cane Corso should be a nobile breed, and a relatively short coat lends to that regal air.

 

Certainly there are areas on the dog, such as on the sides of the neck and on the britches, where one can see that the coat is a little bit longer, because when it changes direction, it lifts from the skin. But the Cane Corso should have an overall clean silhouette.

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